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Walmart

Walmart Inc. ( /ˈwɔːlmɑːrt/; formerly Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.) is an American multinational retail corporation that operates a chain of hypermarkets, discount department stores, and grocery stores from the United States, headquartered in Bentonville, Arkansas.[11] The company was founded by Sam Walton in 1962 and incorporated on October 31, 1969. It also owns and operates Sam’s Club retail warehouses.[12][13] As of January 31, 2021, Walmart has 11,443 stores and clubs in 27 countries, operating under 56 different names.[2][3][14] The company operates under the name Walmart in the United States and Canada, as Walmart de México y Centroamérica in Mexico and Central America, as Asda in the United Kingdom, as the Seiyu Group in Japan, and as Flipkart Wholesale in India. It has wholly owned operations in Argentina, Chile, Canada, and South Africa. Since August 2018, Walmart holds only a minority stake in Walmart Brasil, which was renamed Grupo Big in August 2019, with 20 percent of the company’s shares, and private equity firm Advent International holding 80 percent ownership of the company.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walmart

The Walt Disney Company

The Walt Disney Company, commonly known as Disney (/ˈdɪzni/),[3] is an American diversified multinational mass media and entertainment conglomerate headquartered at the Walt Disney Studios complex in Burbank, California.

Disney was originally founded on October 16, 1923, by brothers Walt and Roy O. Disney as the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio; it also operated under the names The Walt Disney Studio and Walt Disney Productions before officially changing its name to The Walt Disney Company in 1986. The company established itself as a leader in the American animation industry before diversifying into live-action film production, television, and theme parks.

Since the 1980s, Disney has created and acquired corporate divisions in order to market more mature content than is typically associated with its flagship family-oriented brands. The company is known for its film studio division, The Walt Disney Studios, which includes Walt Disney Pictures, Walt Disney Animation Studios, Pixar, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, 20th Century Studios, Searchlight Pictures, and Blue Sky Studios. Disney’s other main business units include divisions in television, broadcasting, streaming media, theme park resorts, consumer products, publishing, and international operations. Through these various segments, Disney owns and operates the ABC broadcast network; cable television networks such as Disney Channel, ESPN, Freeform, FX, and National Geographic; publishing, merchandising, music, and theater divisions; direct-to-consumer streaming services such as Disney+, Hulu, ESPN+, and Hotstar; and Disney Parks, Experiences and Products, a group of 14 theme parks, resort hotels, and cruise lines around the world.[4][5] Cartoon character Mickey Mouse, created in 1928 by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks, is one of the world’s most recognizable characters and serves as the company’s official mascot.[citation needed]

The company, which trades on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under DIS stock symbol,[6] has been a component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average since 1991.[7] In August 2020, just under two-thirds of the stock was owned by large financial institutions.[8]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Walt_Disney_Company

Walt Disney Pictures

Walt Disney Pictures[3] is an American film production studio that is a subsidiary of Walt Disney Studios, which is owned by The Walt Disney Company. The studio is the flagship producer of live-action feature films within the Walt Disney Studios unit, and is based at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, California. Animated films produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pixar Animation Studios are also released under the studio banner. Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures distributes and markets the films produced by Walt Disney Pictures.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Disney_Pictures

Walt Disney Studios (division)

The Walt Disney Studios is an American film and entertainment studio, and one of the four business segments of The Walt Disney Company.[3] Based in Burbank, California, the studio is best known for its multi-faceted film divisions. Founded in 1923, it is the fourth-oldest and one of the “Big Five” major film studios.[4]

The Walt Disney Studios division has prominent film production companies. These include: Walt Disney Pictures, Walt Disney Animation Studios, Pixar, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, 20th Century Studios and Searchlight Pictures. Disney Media and Entertainment Distribution distributes and markets the content produced by these studios for both theatrical exhibition and the company’s streaming services. In 2019, Disney posted an industry record of $13.2 billion at the global box office.[5] The studio has released six of the top ten highest-grossing films of all time worldwide, and the two highest-grossing film franchises of all time.

The Walt Disney Studios is a member of the Motion Picture Association (MPA).

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Disney_Studios_(division)

Warner Bros.

Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. (commonly known as Warner Bros.[a] and abbreviated as WB) is an American diversified multinational mass media and entertainment conglomerate headquartered at the Warner Bros. Studios complex in Burbank, California, and a subsidiary of AT&T’s WarnerMedia through its Studios & Networks division. Founded in 1923 by brothers Harry, Albert, Sam, and Jack Warner, the company established itself as a leader in the American film industry before diversifying into animation, television, and video games, and is one of the “Big Five” major American film studios, as well as a member of the Motion Picture Association (MPA).

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warner_Bros.

Warner Bros. Pictures

Warner Bros. Pictures is an American film production and distribution company owned by the WarnerMedia Studios & Networks Group. Headquartered at the Warner Bros. Studios, Burbank.

Studios complex in Burbank, California, it is the flagship label of the Warner Bros. Pictures Group division of Warner Bros. Entertainment, itself a division of AT&T’s WarnerMedia. Founded in 1923 by Harry Warner, Albert Warner, Sam Warner, and Jack L. Warner, in addition to producing its own films, it handles filmmaking operations, theatrical distribution, marketing and promotion for films produced and released by other Warner Bros. labels, including Warner Bros. Animation, Warner Animation Group, New Line Cinema, DC Films, and Castle Rock Entertainment, as well as various third-party producers.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warner_Bros._Pictures

WarnerMedia

Warner Media, LLC (stylized as WarnerMedia) is an American multinational mass media and entertainment conglomerate corporation owned by AT&T and headquartered in New York City, United States. It was originally formed in 1990 by Steve Ross and formerly known as Time Warner from 1990 to 2001 and 2003 to 2018, from the merger of Time Inc. and the original Warner Communications. The company has film, television and cable operations, with its assets including WarnerMedia Studios & Networks (consisting of the entertainment assets of Turner Broadcasting, HBO, and Cinemax as well as Warner Bros., which itself consists of the film, animation, television studios and the company’s home entertainment division, DC Comics, New Line Cinema, and, together with ViacomCBS, a 50% interest in The CW television network); WarnerMedia News & Sports (consisting of the news and sports assets of Turner Broadcasting, as well as AT&T SportsNet); WarnerMedia Sales & Distribution (consisting of digital analytics company Xandr and Otter Media); and WarnerMedia Direct (consisting of the HBO Max streaming service).

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/WarnerMedia

Warner Music Group

Warner Music Group Corp. (WMG) is an American multinational entertainment and record label conglomerate headquartered in New York City. It is one of the “big three” recording companies and the third-largest in the global music industry, after Universal Music Group (UMG) and Sony Music Entertainment (SME). Formerly part of Time Warner (now WarnerMedia), WMG was publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange from 2005 until 2011, when it announced its privatization and sale to Access Industries.[6] It later had its second IPO on Nasdaq in 2020, once again becoming a public company.[7] With a multibillion-dollar annual turnover, WMG employs more than 3,500 people and has operations in more than 50 countries throughout the world.[8]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warner_Music_Group

Wave

In physics, mathematics, and related fields, a wave is a disturbance (change from equilibrium) of one or more fields such that the field values oscillate repeatedly about a stable equilibrium (resting) value. If the relative amplitude of oscillation at different points in the field remains constant, the wave is said to be a standing wave. If the relative amplitude at different points in the field changes, the wave is said to be a traveling wave. Waves can only exist in fields when there is a force that tends to restore the field to equilibrium.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave

Wavelength

In physics, the wavelength is the spatial period of a periodic wave—the distance over which the wave’s shape repeats. It is the distance between consecutive corresponding points of the same phase on the wave, such as two adjacent crests, troughs, or zero crossings, and is a characteristic of both traveling waves and standing waves, as well as other spatial wave patterns. The inverse of the wavelength is called the spatial frequency. Wavelength is commonly designated by the Greek letter lambda (λ). The term wavelength is also sometimes applied to modulated waves, and to the sinusoidal envelopes of modulated waves or waves formed by interference of several sinusoids.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wavelength

Wearable computer

A wearable computer, also known as a wearable or body-borne computer, is a computing device worn on the body.[3]

The definition of ‘wearable computer’ may be narrow or broad, extending to smartphones or even ordinary wristwatches.[4][5]

Wearables may be for general use, in which case they are just a particularly small example of mobile computing. Alternatively they may be for specialized purposes such as fitness trackers. They may incorporate special sensors such as accelerometers, thermometer and heart rate monitors, or novel user interfaces such as Google Glass, an optical head-mounted display controlled by gestures. It may be that specialized wearables will evolve into general all-in-one devices, as happened with the convergence of PDAs and mobile phones into smartphones.

Wearables are typically worn on the wrist (e.g. fitness trackers), hung from the neck (like a necklace), strapped to the arm or leg (smartphones when exercising), or on the head (as glasses or a helmet), though some have been located elsewhere (e.g. on a finger or in a shoe). Devices carried in a pocket or bag – such as smartphones and before them pocket calculators and PDAs, may or may not be regarded as ‘worn’.

Wearable computers have various technical issues common to other mobile computing, such as batteries, heat dissipation, software architectures, wireless and personal area networks, and data management. Many wearable computers are active all the time, e.g. processing or recording data continuously.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wearable_computer

Wearable technology

Wearable technology, wearables, fashion technology, smartwear, tech togs, skin electronics or fashion electronics are smart electronic devices (electronic device with micro-controllers) that are worn close to and/or on the surface of the skin, where they detect, analyze, and transmit information concerning e.g. body signals such as vital signs, and/or ambient data and which allow in some cases immediate biofeedback to the wearer.

Wearable devices such as activity trackers are an example of the Internet of Things, since “things” such as electronics, software, sensors, and connectivity are effectors that enable objects to exchange data (including data quality) through the internet with a manufacturer, operator, and/or other connected devices, without requiring human intervention.

Wearable technology has a variety of applications which grows as the field itself expands. It appears prominently in consumer electronics with the popularization of the smartwatch and activity tracker. Apart from commercial uses, wearable technology is being incorporated into navigation systems, advanced textiles, and healthcare.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wearable_technology

Web 2.0

Web 2.0 (also known as Participative (or Participatory)[1] and Social Web)[2] refers to websites that emphasize user-generated content, ease of use, participatory culture and interoperability (i.e., compatible with other products, systems, and devices) for end users.

The term was coined by Darcy DiNucci in 1999[3] and later popularized by Tim O’Reilly and Dale Dougherty at the first O’Reilly Media Web 2.0 Conference in late 2004.[4][5][6] Although the term mimics the numbering of software versions, it does not denote a formal change in the nature of the World Wide Web, but merely describes a general change that occurred during this period as interactive websites proliferated and came to overshadow the older, more static websites of the original Web.[2]

A Web 2.0 website allows users to interact and collaborate with each other through social media dialogue as creators of user-generated content in a virtual community. This contrasts the first generation of Web 1.0-era websites where people were limited to viewing content in a passive manner. Examples of Web 2.0 features include social networking sites or social media sites (e.g., Facebook), blogs, wikis, folksonomies (“tagging” keywords on websites and links), video sharing sites (e.g., YouTube), image sharing sites (e.g., Flickr), hosted services, Web applications (“apps”), collaborative consumption platforms, and mashup applications.

Whether Web 2.0 is substantially different from prior Web technologies has been challenged by World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, who describes the term as jargon.[7] His original vision of the Web was “a collaborative medium, a place where we [could] all meet and read and write.”[8][9] On the other hand, the term Semantic Web (sometimes referred to as Web 3.0)[10] was coined by Berners-Lee to refer to a web of content where the meaning can be processed by machines.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2.0

Web application

A web application (or web app) is application software that runs on a web server, unlike computer-based software programs that are run locally on the operating system (OS) of the device. Web applications are accessed by the user through a web browser with an active network connection. These applications are programmed using a client–server modeled structure—the user (“client”) is provided services through an off-site server that is hosted by a third-party. Examples of commonly-used web applications include: web-mail, online retail sales, online banking, and online auctions.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_application

Web browser

A web browser (commonly referred to as a browser) is a software application for accessing information on the World Wide Web. When a user requests a web page from a particular website, the web browser retrieves the necessary content from a web server and then displays the page on the user’s device.

A web browser is not the same thing as a search engine, though the two are often confused.[1][2] For a user, a search engine is just a website that provides links to other websites. However, to connect to a website’s server and display its web pages, a user must have a web browser installed.[3]

Web browsers are used on a range of devices, including desktops, laptops, tablets, and smartphones. In 2020, an estimated 4.9 billion people used a browser, with more than half of them in Asia.[4] The most used browser is Google Chrome, with a 63% global market share on all devices, followed by Safari with 19%.[5] Other notable browsers include Firefox and Microsoft Edge.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_browser

Web conferencing

Web conferencing is used as an umbrella term for various types of online conferencing and collaborative services including webinars (web seminars), webcasts, and web meetings. Sometimes it may be used also in the more narrow sense of the peer-level web meeting context, in an attempt to disambiguate it from the other types known as collaborative sessions.[1] The terminology related to these technologies is exact and agreed relying on the standards for web conferencing but specific organizations practices in usage exist to provide also term usage reference.

In general, web conferencing is made possible by Internet technologies, particularly on TCP/IP connections. Services may allow real-time point-to-point communications as well as multicast communications from one sender to many receivers. It offers data streams of text-based messages, voice and video chat to be shared simultaneously, across geographically dispersed locations. Applications for web conferencing include meetings, training events, lectures, or presentations from a web-connected computer to other web-connected computers.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_conferencing

Web content

Web content is the textual, visual, or aural content that is encountered as part of the user experience on websites. It may include—among other things—text, images, sounds, videos, and animations.

In Information Architecture for the World Wide Web, Lou Rosenfeld and Peter Morville write, “We define content broadly as ‘the stuff in your Web site.’ This may include documents, data, applications, e-services, images, audio and video files, personal Web pages, archived e-mail messages, and more. And we include future stuff as well as present stuff.”[1]

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_content

Web crawler

A Web crawler, sometimes called a spider or spiderbot and often shortened to crawler, is an Internet bot that systematically browses the World Wide Web, typically for the purpose of Web indexing (web spidering).

Web search engines and some other websites use Web crawling or spidering software to update their web content or indices of other sites’ web content. Web crawlers copy pages for processing by a search engine, which indexes the downloaded pages so that users can search more efficiently.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_crawler

Web directory

A web directory or link directory is an online list or catalog of websites. That is, it is a directory on the World Wide Web of (all or part of) the World Wide Web. Historically, directories typically listed entries on people or businesses, and their contact information; such directories are still in use today. A web directory includes entries about websites, including links to those websites, organized into categories and subcategories.[1][2][3] Besides a link, each entry may include the title of the website, and a description of its contents. In most web directories, the entries are about whole websites, rather than individual pages within them (called “deep links”). Websites are often limited to inclusion in only a few categories.

There are two ways to find information on the Web: by searching or browsing. Web directories provide links in a structured list to make browsing easier. Many web directories combine searching and browsing by providing a search engine to search the directory. Unlike search engines, which base results on a database of entries gathered automatically by web crawler, most web directories are built manually by human editors. Many web directories allow site owners to submit their site for inclusion, and have editors review submissions for fitness.

Web directories may be general in scope, or limited to particular subjects or fields. Entries may be listed for free, or by paid submission (meaning the site owner must pay to have his or her website listed).

RSS directories are similar to web directories, but contain collections of RSS feeds, instead of links to web sites.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_directory

Web hosting service

A web hosting service (often shortened to web host) is a type of Internet hosting service that allows individuals and organizations to make their website accessible via the World Wide Web. Web hosts are companies that provide space on a server owned or leased for use by clients, as well as providing Internet connectivity, typically in a data center. Web hosts can also provide data center space and connectivity to the Internet for other servers located in their data center, called colocation, also known as housing in Latin America or France.

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_hosting_service

Web navigation

Web navigation refers to the process of navigating a network of information resources in the World Wide Web, which is organized as hypertext or hypermedia.[1] The user interface that is used to do so is called a web browser.[2]

A central theme in web design is the development of a web navigation interface that maximizes usability.

A website overall navigational scheme includes several navigational pieces such as global, local, supplemental, and contextual navigation; all of these are vital aspects of the broad topic of web navigation.[3] Hierarchical navigation systems are vital as well since it is the primary navigation system. It allows for the user to navigate within the site using levels alone, which is often seen as restricting and requires additional navigation systems to better structure the website.[4] The global navigation of a website, as another segment of web navigation, serves as the outline and template in order to achieve an easy maneuver for the users accessing the site, while local navigation is often used to help the users within a specific section of the site.[3] All these navigational pieces fall under the categories of various types of web navigation, allowing for further development and for more efficient experiences upon visiting a webpage.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_navigation

Web page

A web page (or webpage) is a specific collection of information provided by a website and displayed to a user in a web browser. A website typically consists of many web pages linked together in a coherent fashion. The name “web page” is a metaphor of paper pages bound together into a book.

The core element of a web page is one or more text files written in the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). Many web pages also make use of JavaScript code for dynamic behavior and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) code for presentation semantics. Images, videos, and other multimedia files are also often embedded in web pages.

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_page

Web portal

A web portal is a specially designed website that brings information from diverse sources, like emails, online forums and search engines, together in a uniform way. Usually, each information source gets its dedicated area on the page for displaying information (a portlet); often, the user can configure which ones to display. Variants of portals include mashups and intranet “dashboards” for executives and managers. The extent to which content is displayed in a “uniform way” may depend on the intended user and the intended purpose, as well as the diversity of the content. Very often design emphasis is on a certain “metaphor” for configuring and customizing the presentation of the content (e.g., a dashboard or map) and the chosen implementation framework or code libraries. In addition, the role of the user in an organization may determine which content can be added to the portal or deleted from the portal configuration.

A portal may use a search engine’s application programming interface (API) to permit users to search intranet content as opposed to extranet content by restricting which domains may be searched. Apart from this common search engines feature, web portals may offer other services such as e-mail, news, stock quotes, information from databases and even entertainment content. Portals provide a way for enterprises and organizations to provide a consistent “look and feel” with access control and procedures for multiple applications and databases, which otherwise would have been different web entities at various URLs. The features available may be restricted by whether access is by an authorized and authenticated user (employee, member) or an anonymous website visitor.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_portal

Web resource

A web resource, or simply resource, is any identifiable thing, whether digital, physical, or abstract.[1][2][3] Resources are identified using Uniform Resource Identifiers.[1][4] In the Semantic Web, web resources and their semantic properties are described using the Resource Description Framework.[5]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_resource

Web search engine

web search engine or Internet search engine is a software system that is designed to carry out web search (Internet search), which means to search the World Wide Web in a systematic way for particular information specified in a textual web search query. The search results are generally presented in a line of results, often referred to as search engine results pages (SERPs). The information may be a mix of links to web pages, images, videos, infographics, articles, research papers, and other types of files. Some search engines also mine data available in databases or open directories. Unlike web directories, which are maintained only by human editors, search engines also maintain real-time information by running an algorithm on a web crawler. Internet content that is not capable of being searched by a web search engine is generally described as the deep web.

As of 2019, active search engine crawlers include those of Google, Sogou, Baidu, Bing, Gigablast, Mojeek, DuckDuckGo and Yandex.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_search_engine

Web server

A web server is server software, or a system of one or more computers dedicated to running this software, that can satisfy client HTTP requests on the public World Wide Web or also on private LANs and WANs.

A web server can manage client HTTP requests for Web Resources related to one or more of its configured / served websites.

A web server usually receives incoming network HTTP requests and sends outgoing HTTP responses (one for each processed request), along with web contents, through transparent and / or encrypted TCP/IP connections (See also: HTTPS) which are started by client user agents before sending their HTTP request(s). Web servers may soon be able to handle other types of transport protocols for HTTP requests.

The purpose of a web server is to store and deliver web contents and / or web resources. Examples of web contents may be HTML files, XHTML files, image files, style sheets, scripts, other types of generic files that may be downloaded by clients, etc.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_server

Web service

The term Web service (WS) is either: web services only for other application or machine not human

a service offered by an electronic device to another electronic device, communicating with each other via the World Wide Web, or
a server running on a computer device, listening for requests at a particular port over a network, serving web documents (HTML, JSON, XML, images), and creating[clarification needed] web applications services, which serve in solving specific domain problems over the Web (WWW, Internet, HTTP)
In a Web service a Web technology such as HTTP is used for transferring machine-readable file formats such as XML and JSON.

In practice, a web service commonly provides and viewed an object-oriented Web-based interface to a database server, utilized for example by another Web server, or by a mobile app, that provides a user interface to the end-user. Many organizations that provide data in formatted HTML pages will also provide that data on their server as XML or JSON, often through a Web service to allow syndication, for example, Wikipedia’s Export. Another application offered to the end-user may be a mashup, where a Web server consumes several Web services at different machines and compiles the content into one user interface.

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_service

Webcast

A webcast is a media presentation distributed over the Internet using streaming media technology to distribute a single content source to many simultaneous listeners/viewers. A webcast may either be distributed live or on demand. Essentially, webcasting is “broadcasting” over the Internet.

The largest “webcasters” include existing radio and TV stations, who “simulcast” their output through online TV or online radio streaming, as well as a multitude of Internet only “stations”. Webcasting usually consists of providing non-interactive linear streams or events. Rights and licensing bodies offer specific “webcasting licenses” to those wishing to carry out Internet broadcasting using copyrighted material.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webcast

Webmail

Webmail (or web-based email) is an email service that can be accessed using a standard web browser. It contrasts with email service accessible through a specialised email client software. Examples of webmail providers are AOL Mail, Gmail, Mailfence, Outlook.com/Hotmail.com, Yahoo! Mail and IceWarp Mail Server. Additionally, many internet service providers provide webmail as part of their internet service package. Similarly, some web hosting providers also provide webmail as a part of their hosting package.

Webmail access is made possible through webmail software, such as Roundcube or SquirrelMail, installed and running on the email server.

As with any web application, webmail’s main advantage over the use of a desktop email client is the ability to send and receive email anywhere from a web browser. Its main disadvantage is the need to be connected to the Internet while using it.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webmail

Website

A website (also written as web site) is a collection of web pages and related content that is identified by a common domain name and published on at least one web server. Notable examples are wikipedia.org, google.com, and amazon.com.

All publicly accessible websites collectively constitute the World Wide Web. There are also private websites that can only be accessed on a private network, such as a company’s internal website for its employees.

Websites are typically dedicated to a particular topic or purpose, such as news, education, commerce, entertainment, or social networking. Hyperlinking between web pages guides the navigation of the site, which often starts with a home page.

Users can access websites on a range of devices, including desktops, laptops, tablets, and smartphones. The software application used on these devices is called a web browser.

Więcej na stronie Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Website

WeChat

WeChat (Chinese: 微信; pinyin: Wēixìn (About this soundlisten); lit. ‘micro-message’) is a Chinese multi-purpose messaging, social media and mobile payment app developed by Tencent. First released in 2011, it became the world’s largest standalone mobile app in 2018,[2][3] with over 1 billion monthly active users.[4][5][6] WeChat has been described as China’s “app for everything” and a “super app” because of its wide range of functions.[7] WeChat provides text messaging, hold-to-talk voice messaging, broadcast (one-to-many) messaging, video conferencing, video games, sharing of photographs and videos, and location sharing.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/WeChat

Western Digital

Western Digital Corporation (abbreviated WDC, commonly known as simply Western Digital and WD) is an American computer hard disk drive manufacturer and data storage company. It designs, manufactures and sells data technology products, including storage devices, data center systems and cloud storage services.

Western Digital has a long history in the electronics industry as an integrated circuit maker and a storage products company. It is one of the largest computer hard disk drive manufacturers, along with producing SSDs and flash memory devices. Its competitors include the data management and storage companies Seagate Technology and Micron Technology.

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Digital

WhatsApp

WhatsApp Messenger, or simply WhatsApp, is an American freeware, cross-platform centralized messaging and voice-over-IP (VoIP) service owned by Facebook, Inc.[14] It allows users to send text messages and voice messages,[15] make voice and video calls, and share images, documents, user locations, and other content.[16][17] WhatsApp’s client application runs on mobile devices but is also accessible from desktop computers, as long as the user’s mobile device remains connected to the Internet while they use the desktop app.[18] The service requires each user to provide a standard cellular mobile telephone number for registering with the service.[19] In January 2018, WhatsApp released a standalone business app targeted at small business owners, called WhatsApp Business, to allow companies to communicate with customers who use the standard WhatsApp client.

The client application was created by WhatsApp Inc. of Mountain View, California, which was acquired by Facebook in February 2014 for approximately US$19.3 billion.[22][23] It became the world’s most popular messaging application by 2015,[24][25] and has over 2 billion users worldwide as of February 2020.[26] It has become the primary means of internet communication in multiple locations, including Latin America, the Indian subcontinent, and large parts of Europe and Africa.

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/WhatsApp

Wi-Fi

Wi-Fi (/ˈwaɪfaɪ/) is a family of wireless networking technologies, based on the IEEE 802.11 family of standards, which are commonly used for local area networking of devices and Internet access. Wi‑Fi is a trademark of the non-profit Wi-Fi Alliance, which restricts the use of the term Wi-Fi Certified to products that successfully complete interoperability certification testing. As of 2010, the Wi-Fi Alliance consisted of more than 375 companies from around the world. As of 2009, Wi-Fi-integrated circuit chips shipped approximately 580 million units yearly. Devices that can use Wi-Fi technologies include desktops and laptops, smartphones and tablets, smart TVs, printers, digital audio players, digital cameras, cars and drones.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-Fi

Wide area network

A wide area network (WAN) is a telecommunications network that extends over a large geographic area for the primary purpose of computer networking. Wide area networks are often established with leased telecommunication circuits.

Businesses, as well as schools and government entities, use wide area networks to relay data to staff, students, clients, buyers and suppliers from various locations across the world. In essence, this mode of telecommunication allows a business to effectively carry out its daily function regardless of location. The Internet may be considered a WAN.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wide_area_network

Wiki

A wiki (/ˈwɪki/ (About this soundlisten) WIK-ee) is a hypertext publication collaboratively edited and managed by its own audience directly using a web browser. A typical wiki contains multiple pages for the subjects or scope of the project and could be either open to the public or limited to use within an organization for maintaining its internal knowledge base.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki

Wikimedia Foundation

The Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. (WMF, or simply Wikimedia) is an American non-profit and charitable organization headquartered in San Francisco, California.[9] The foundation supports and participates in the Wikimedia movement, owning the internet domain names of its projects and hosting its websites, including Wikipedia and Wikimedia Commons. The foundation was established in 2003 by Jimmy Wales as a way to fund Wikipedia and its sibling projects through non-profit means.

As of 2020, the foundation employs over 300 people, with annual revenues in excess of US$109.9 million.[10] María Sefidari is chair of the board.[5] Katherine Maher has been the executive director since March 2016.

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikimedia_Foundation

Wikipedia

Wikipedia (/ˌwɪkɪˈpiːdiə/ (About this soundlisten) wik-ih-PEE-dee-ə or /ˌwɪki-/ (About this soundlisten) wik-ee-) is a free, multilingual open-collaborative online encyclopedia created and maintained by a community of volunteer contributors using a wiki-based editing system. Wikipedia is the largest general reference work on the Internet,[3] and one of the 15 most popular websites as ranked by Alexa; in 2021, it was ranked as the 13th most visited.[4][note 3] The project carries no advertisements and is hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation, an American non-profit organization funded mainly through donations, 80% of which are small donations from individual users.[6]

Wikipedia was launched on January 15, 2001, by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger; Sanger coined its name as a portmanteau of “wiki” and “encyclopedia”.[7][8] Initially available only in English, versions in other languages were quickly developed. The English Wikipedia, with 6.3 million articles as of March 2021, is the largest of the 319 language editions. Combined, Wikipedia’s editions comprise more than 56 million articles, and attract more than 17 million edits and more than 1.7 billion unique visitors per month.[9][10]

Wikipedia has been criticized for its uneven accuracy and for exhibiting systemic bias, particularly gender bias, with the majority of editors being male.[11] In 2006, Time magazine stated that the open-door policy of allowing anyone to edit had made Wikipedia the “biggest and perhaps the best encyclopedia in the world”, and a testament to the vision of Jimmy Wales.[12] The project’s reputation improved further in the 2010s, as it received praise for its unique structure, culture, and absence of commercial bias.[3][11] In 2018, Facebook and YouTube announced that they would help users detect fake news by suggesting links to related Wikipedia articles.[13]

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia

Windows 10

Windows 10 is a series of operating systems developed by Microsoft and released as part of its Windows NT family of operating systems. It is the successor to Windows 8.1, released nearly two years earlier, and was released to manufacturing on July 15, 2015, and broadly released for the general public on July 29, 2015.[18] Windows 10 was made available for download via MSDN and Technet, and as a free upgrade for retail copies of Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 users via the Windows Store. Windows 10 receives new builds on an ongoing basis, which are available at no additional cost to users, in addition to additional test builds of Windows 10, which are available to Windows Insiders. Devices in enterprise environments can receive these updates at a slower pace, or use long-term support milestones that only receive critical updates, such as security patches, over their ten-year lifespan of extended support.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_10

Windows 10 Mobile

Windows 10 Mobile is a discontinued mobile operating system developed by Microsoft. First released in 2015, it is a successor to Windows Phone 8.1, but was marketed by Microsoft as being an edition of its PC operating system Windows 10.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_10_Mobile

Wire transfer

Wire transfer, bank transfer or credit transfer, is a method of electronic funds transfer from one person or entity to another. A wire transfer can be made from one bank account to another bank account, or through a transfer of cash at a cash office.

Different wire transfer systems and operators provide a variety of options relative to the immediacy and finality of settlement and the cost, value, and volume of transactions. Central bank wire transfer systems, such as the Federal Reserve’s Fedwire system in the United States, are more likely to be real-time gross settlement (RTGS) systems, as they provide the quickest availability of funds. This is because they post the gross (complete) entry against electronic accounts of the wire transfer system operator.[clarification needed] Other systems, such as the Clearing House Interbank Payments System (CHIPS), provide net settlement on a periodic basis. More immediate settlement systems tend to process higher monetary value time-critical transactions, have higher transaction costs, and have a smaller volume of payments. A faster settlement process allows less time for currency fluctuations while money is in transit.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wire_transfer

Wireless

Wireless communication (or just wireless, when the context allows) is the transfer of information between two or more points that do not use an electrical conductor as a medium by which to perform the transfer. The most common wireless technologies use radio waves. With radio waves, intended distances can be short, such as a few meters for Bluetooth or as far as millions of kilometers for deep-space radio communications. It encompasses various types of fixed, mobile, and portable applications, including two-way radios, cellular telephones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and wireless networking. Other examples of applications of radio wireless technology include GPS units, garage door openers, wireless computer mouse, keyboards and headsets, headphones, radio receivers, satellite television, broadcast television and cordless telephones. Somewhat less common methods of achieving wireless communications include the use of other electromagnetic wireless technologies, such as light, magnetic, or electric fields or the use of sound.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless

In computer networking, a wireless access point (WAP), or more generally just access point (AP), is a networking hardware device that allows other Wi-Fi devices to connect to a wired network. As a standalone device, the AP may have a wired connection to a router, but, in a wireless router, it can also be an integral component of the router itself. An AP is differentiated from a hotspot which is a physical location where Wi-Fi access is available.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_access_point

Wireless device radiation and health

The antennas contained in mobile phones, including smartphones, emit radiofrequency (RF) radiation (non-ionizing “radio waves” such as microwaves); the parts of the head or body nearest to the antenna can absorb this energy and convert it to heat. Since at least the 1990s, scientists have researched whether the now-ubiquitous radiation associated with mobile phone antennas or cell phone towers is affecting human health. Mobile phone networks use various bands of RF frequency, some of which overlap with the microwave range. Other digital wireless systems, such as data communication networks, produce similar radiation.

In response to public concern, the World Health Organization established the International EMF Project in 1996 to assess the scientific evidence of possible health effects of EMF in the frequency range from 0 to 300 GHz. They have stated that although extensive research has been conducted into possible health effects of exposure to many parts of the frequency spectrum, all reviews conducted so far have indicated that, as long as exposures are below the limits recommended in the ICNIRP (1998) EMF guidelines, which cover the full frequency range from 0–300 GHz, such exposures do not produce any known adverse health effect. In 2011, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), an agency of the World Health Organization, classified wireless radiation as Group 2B – possibly carcinogenic. That means that there “could be some risk” of carcinogenicity, so additional research into the long-term, heavy use of wireless devices needs to be conducted. The WHO states that “A large number of studies have been performed over the last two decades to assess whether mobile phones pose a potential health risk. To date, no adverse health effects have been established as being caused by mobile phone use.”

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_device_radiation_and_health

wireless network is a computer network that uses wireless data connections between network nodes.

Wireless networking is a method by which homes, telecommunications networks and business installations avoid the costly process of introducing cables into a building, or as a connection between various equipment locations. admin telecommunications networks are generally implemented and administered using radio communication. This implementation takes place at the physical level (layer) of the OSI model network structure.

Examples of wireless networks include cell phone networks, wireless local area networks (WLANs), wireless sensor networks, satellite communication networks, and terrestrial microwave networks.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_network

Wireless sensor network

Wireless sensor network (WSN) refers to a group of spatially dispersed and dedicated sensors for monitoring and recording the physical conditions of the environment and organizing the collected data at a central location. WSNs measure environmental conditions like temperature, sound, pollution levels, humidity, wind, and so on.[1]

These are similar to wireless ad hoc networks in the sense that they rely on wireless connectivity and spontaneous formation of networks so that sensor data can be transported wirelessly. WSNs are spatially distributed autonomous sensors to monitor physical or environmental conditions, such as temperature, sound, pressure, etc. and to cooperatively pass their data through the network to a main location. The more modern networks are bi-directional, both collecting data from distributed sensors and enabling control of sensor activity.[3] The development of wireless sensor networks was motivated by military applications such as battlefield surveillance;[4] today such networks are used in many industrial and consumer applications, such as industrial process monitoring and control, machine health monitoring, and so on.

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_sensor_network

Wix.com

Wix.com Ltd. (Hebrew: וויקס.קום‎) is an Israeli software company, providing cloud-based web development services. It allows users to create HTML5 websites and mobile sites through the use of online drag and drop tools. Along with its headquarters and other offices in Israel, Wix also has offices in Brazil, Canada, Germany, India, Ireland, Lithuania, the United States, and Ukraine.

Users can add social plug-ins, e-commerce, online marketing, contact forms, e-mail marketing, and community forums to their web sites using a variety of Wix-developed and third-party applications.[5][6] The Wix website builder is built on a freemium business model, earning its revenues through premium upgrades.

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wix.com

The Web of Things (WoT) is software architectural styles and programming patterns that allow real-world objects to be part of the World Wide Web. Similarly to what the Web (Application Layer) is to the Internet (Network Layer), the Web of Things provides an Application Layer that simplifies the creation of Internet of Things (IoT) applications composed of multiple devices across different platforms and application domains. Differently from IoT which focuses on the Network Layer, WoT assumes that the connectivity between the devices is achieved and focuses on how to build applications.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_of_Things

WordPress

WordPress (WP, WordPress.org) is a free and open-source content management system (CMS) written in PHP[4] and paired with a MySQL or MariaDB database. Features include a plugin architecture and a template system, referred to within WordPress as Themes. WordPress was originally created as a blog-publishing system but has evolved to support other web content types including more traditional mailing lists and forums, media galleries, membership sites, learning management systems (LMS) and online stores. WordPress is used by more than 60 million websites, including 39% of the top 10 million websites as of January 2021, WordPress is one of the most popular content management system solutions in use.[9] WordPress has also been used for other application domains, such as pervasive display systems (PDS).

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/WordPress

World Digital Library

The World Digital Library (WDL) is an international digital library operated by UNESCO and the United States Library of Congress.

The WDL has stated that its mission is to promote international and intercultural understanding, expand the volume and variety of cultural content on the Internet, provide resources for educators, scholars, and general audiences, and to build capacity in partner institutions to narrow the digital divide within and among countries.[1] It aims to expand non-English and non-western content on the Internet, and contribute to scholarly research. The library intends to make available on the Internet, free of charge and in multilingual format, significant primary materials from cultures around the world, including manuscripts, maps, rare books, musical scores, recordings, films, prints, photographs, architectural drawings, and other significant cultural materials.[2][3][4]

The WDL opened with 1,236 items.[5] As of early 2018, it lists more than 18,000 items from nearly 200 countries, dating back to 8,000 BCE.

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Digital_Library

World Health Organization

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations responsible for international public health.[1] The WHO Constitution, which establishes the agency’s governing structure and principles, states its main objective as “the attainment by all peoples of the highest possible level of health.”[2] It is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, with six semi-autonomous regional offices and 150 field offices worldwide.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Health_Organization

The World Wide Web (WWW), commonly known as the Web, is an information system where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs, such as https://www.example.com/), which may be interlinked by hypertext, and are accessible over the Internet. The resources of the WWW are transferred via the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) and may be accessed by users by a software application called a web browser and are published by a software application called a web server.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Wide_Web

World Wide Web Consortium

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is the main international standards organization for the World Wide Web. Founded in 1994 and currently led by Tim Berners-Lee, the consortium is made up of member organizations that maintain full-time staff working together in the development of standards for the World Wide Web. As of 21 October 2019, W3C had 443 members.[3][2] W3C also engages in education and outreach, develops software and serves as an open forum for discussion about the Web.

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Wide_Web_Consortium

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