Categories
0-z

5G – S

S

SAIC Motor

SAIC Motor Corporation Limited (SAIC, formerly Shanghai Automotive Industry Corporation) is a Chinese state-owned automotive design and manufacturing company headquartered in Shanghai, with multinational operations. A Fortune Global 100 company and one of the “Big Four” state-owned Chinese automakers (along with Changan Automobile, FAW Group, and Dongfeng Motor Corporation),[5] the company had the largest production volume of any Chinese automaker in 2014, making more than 4.5 million vehicles.[6] Its manufacturing mix is not wholly consumer offerings, however, with as many as one million SAIC passenger vehicles being commercial vans.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAIC_Motor

Salesforce

Salesforce.com, Inc. is an American cloud-based software company headquartered in San Francisco, California. It provides customer relationship management (CRM) service and also provides a complementary suite of enterprise applications focused on customer service, marketing automation, analytics, and application development.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salesforce

Samsung

The Samsung Group is a South Korean multinational conglomerate headquartered in Samsung Town, Seoul. It comprises numerous affiliated businesses, most of them united under the Samsung brand, and is the largest South Korean chaebol (business conglomerate).

Samsung was founded by Lee Byung-chul in 1938 as a trading company. Over the next three decades, the group diversified into areas including food processing, textiles, insurance, securities, and retail. Samsung entered the electronics industry in the late 1960s and the construction and shipbuilding industries in the mid-1970s; these areas would drive its subsequent growth. Following Lee’s death in 1987, Samsung was separated into five business groups – Samsung Group, Shinsegae Group, CJ Group and Hansol Group, and Joongang Group. Since 1990, Samsung has increasingly globalised its activities and electronics; in particular, its mobile phones and semiconductors have become its most important source of income. As of 2020, Samsung has the 8th highest global brand value.

Notable Samsung industrial affiliates include Samsung Electronics (the world’s largest information technology company, consumer electronics maker and chipmaker measured by 2017 revenues), Samsung Heavy Industries (the world’s 2nd largest shipbuilder measured by 2010 revenues), and Samsung Engineering and Samsung C&T Corporation (respectively the world’s 13th and 36th largest construction companies). Other notable subsidiaries include Samsung Life Insurance (the world’s 14th largest life insurance company), Samsung Everland (operator of Everland Resort, the oldest theme park in South Korea) and Cheil Worldwide (the world’s 15th largest advertising agency, as measured by 2012 revenues).

Samsung has a powerful influence on South Korea’s economic development, politics, media and culture and has been a major driving force behind the “Miracle on the Han River”. Its affiliate companies produce around a fifth of South Korea’s total exports. Samsung’s revenue was equal to 17% of South Korea’s $1,082 billion GDP.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samsung

Samsung Electronics

The Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (Korean: 삼성전자; Hanja: 三星電子; RR: Samsung Jeonja; lit. “tristar electronics”, sometimes shortened to SEC and stylized as SɅMSUNG) is a South Korean multinational electronics company headquartered in the Yeongtong District of Suwon. It is the pinnacle of the Samsung chaebol, accounting for 70% of the group’s revenue in 2012. Samsung Electronics has played a key role in the group’s corporate governance due to circular ownership. Samsung Electronics has assembly plants and sales networks in 74 countries and employs around 290,000 people. It is majority-owned by foreign investors. It is the world’s largest manufacturer of consumer electronics by revenue. As of 2019, Samsung Electronics is the world’s second largest technology company by revenue, and its market capitalization stood at US$520.65 billion, the 12th largest in the world.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samsung_Electronics

SanDisk

SanDisk is a brand of Western Digital for flash memory products, including memory cards and readers, USB flash drives, and solid-state drives. It was acquired by Western Digital in 2016.

As of March 2019, Western Digital is the fourth-largest manufacturer of flash memory having declined from third-largest in 2014.[

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/SanDisk

Sanyo

Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd. (三洋電機株式会社, San’yō Denki Kabushiki-gaisha), stylized as SANYO, was a Japanese electronics company and formerly a member of the Fortune Global 500 whose headquarters was located in Moriguchi, Osaka prefecture, Japan. Sanyo had over 230 subsidiaries and affiliates.[4] Sanyo was founded by Toshio Iue.

On December 21, 2009, Panasonic completed a 400 billion yen ($4.5 billion) acquisition of a 50.2% stake in Sanyo, making Sanyo a subsidiary of Panasonic.[5][6] In April 2011, Sanyo became a wholly owned subsidiary of Panasonic, with its assets integrated into the latter’s portfolio.[7]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanyo

SAP

SAP SE (/ˌɛs.eɪˈpi/) is a German multinational software corporation based in Walldorf, Baden-Württemberg, that develops enterprise software to manage business operations and customer relations.[2][3] The company is especially known for its ERP software.[4][5] SAP is the largest non-American software company by revenue as well as the world’s third-largest publicly-traded software company by revenue.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAP

Satellite

In the context of spaceflight, a satellite is an object that has been intentionally placed into orbit. These objects are called artificial satellites to distinguish them from natural satellites such as Earth’s Moon.

On 4 October 1957 the Soviet Union launched the world’s first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1. Since then, about 8,900 satellites from more than 40 countries have been launched. According to a 2018 estimate, some 5,000 remain in orbit. Of those, about 1,900 were operational, while the rest have exceeded their useful lives and become space debris. Approximately 63% of operational satellites are in low Earth orbit, 6% are in medium-Earth orbit (at 20,000 km), 29% are in geostationary orbit (at 36,000 km) and the remaining 2% are in various elliptical orbits. In terms of countries with the most satellites, the USA has the most with 1,897 satellites, China is second with 412, and Russia third with 176.[1] A few large space stations, including the International Space Station, have been launched in parts and assembled in orbit. Over a dozen space probes have been placed into orbit around other bodies and become artificial satellites of the Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, a few asteroids,[2] a comet and the Sun.

Satellites are used for many purposes. Among several other applications, they can be used to make star maps and maps of planetary surfaces, and also take pictures of planets they are launched into. Common types include military and civilian Earth observation satellites, communications satellites, navigation satellites, weather satellites, and space telescopes. Space stations and human spacecraft in orbit are also satellites.

Satellites can operate by themselves or as part of a larger system, a satellite formation or satellite constellation.

Satellite orbits vary greatly, depending on the purpose of the satellite, and are classified in a number of ways. Well-known (overlapping) classes include low Earth orbit, polar orbit, and geostationary orbit.

A launch vehicle is a rocket that places a satellite into orbit. Usually, it lifts off from a launch pad on land. Some are launched at sea from a submarine or a mobile maritime platform, or aboard a plane (see air launch to orbit).

Satellites are usually semi-independent computer-controlled systems. Satellite subsystems attend many tasks, such as power generation, thermal control, telemetry, attitude control, scientific instrumentation, communication, etc.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satellite

Satellite navigation

A satellite navigation or satnav system is a system that uses satellites to provide autonomous geo-spatial positioning. It allows small electronic receivers to determine their location (longitude, latitude, and altitude/elevation) to high precision (within a few centimeters to metres) using time signals transmitted along a line of sight by radio from satellites. The system can be used for providing position, navigation or for tracking the position of something fitted with a receiver (satellite tracking). The signals also allow the electronic receiver to calculate the current local time to high precision, which allows time synchronisation. These uses are collectively known as Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT). Satnav systems operate independently of any telephonic or internet reception, though these technologies can enhance the usefulness of the positioning information generated.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satellite_navigation

Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) is an instrument for imaging surfaces at the atomic level. Its development in 1981 earned its inventors, Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer (at IBM Zürich), the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1986. For an STM, good resolution is considered to be 0.1 nm lateral resolution and 0.01 nm (10 pm) depth resolution. With this resolution, individual atoms within materials are routinely imaged and manipulated. The STM can be used not only in ultra-high vacuum but also in air, water, and various other liquid or gas ambients, and at temperatures ranging from near zero kelvin to over 1000 °C.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scanning_tunneling_microscope

Science

Science (from the Latin word scientia, meaning “knowledge”)[1] is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe.

The earliest roots of science can be traced to Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia in around 3500 to 3000 BCE. Their contributions to mathematics, astronomy, and medicine entered and shaped Greek natural philosophy of classical antiquity, whereby formal attempts were made to provide explanations of events in the physical world based on natural causes. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, knowledge of Greek conceptions of the world deteriorated in Western Europe during the early centuries (400 to 1000 CE) of the Middle Ages, but was preserved in the Muslim world during the Islamic Golden Age. The recovery and assimilation of Greek works and Islamic inquiries into Western Europe from the 10th to 13th century revived “natural philosophy”, which was later transformed by the Scientific Revolution that began in the 16th century as new ideas and discoveries departed from previous Greek conceptions and traditions. The scientific method soon played a greater role in knowledge creation and it was not until the 19th century that many of the institutional and professional features of science began to take shape; along with the changing of “natural philosophy” to “natural science.”

Modern science is typically divided into three major branches that consist of the natural sciences (e.g., biology, chemistry, and physics), which study nature in the broadest sense; the social sciences (e.g., economics, psychology, and sociology), which study individuals and societies; and the formal sciences (e.g., logic, mathematics, and theoretical computer science), which study abstract concepts. There is disagreement, however, on whether the formal sciences actually constitute a science as they do not rely on empirical evidence.Disciplines that use existing scientific knowledge for practical purposes, such as engineering and medicine, are described as applied sciences.

Science is based on research, which is commonly conducted by scientists working in academic and research institutions, government agencies, and companies. The practical impact of scientific research has led to the emergence of science policies that seek to influence the scientific enterprise by prioritizing the development of commercial products, armaments, health care, public infrastructure, and environmental protection.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science

The branches of science, also referred to as sciences, “scientific fields”, or “scientific disciplines,” are commonly divided into three major groups:

  • Formal sciences: the study of logic, mathematics, which use an a priori, as opposed to empirical, methodology.
  • Natural sciences: the study of natural phenomena (including cosmological, geological, physical, chemical, and biological factors of the universe). Natural science can be divided into two main branches: physical science and life science (or biological science).
  • Social sciences: the study of human behavior and societies.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branches_of_science

Scientific method

The scientific method is an empirical method of acquiring knowledge that has characterized the development of science since at least the 17th century. It involves careful observation, applying rigorous skepticism about what is observed, given that cognitive assumptions can distort how one interprets the observation. It involves formulating hypotheses, via induction, based on such observations; experimental and measurement-based testing of deductions drawn from the hypotheses; and refinement (or elimination) of the hypotheses based on the experimental findings. These are principles of the scientific method, as distinguished from a definitive series of steps applicable to all scientific enterprises.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_method

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), previously science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (SMET), is a broad term used to group together these academic disciplines. This term is typically used to address an education policy or a curriculum choices in schools. It has implications for workforce development, national security concerns and immigration policy. The science in STEM typically refers to two out of the three major branches of science: natural sciences, including biology, physics, and chemistry; and formal sciences, of which mathematics is an example, along with logic and statistics. The third major branch of science, social science such as: psychology, sociology, and political science, are categorized separately from the other two branches of science, and are instead grouped together with humanities and arts to form another counterpart acronym named HASS – Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, rebranded in the UK in 2020 as SHAPE. Psychology however is considered a major part of STEM, besides the other 2 subjects.[5] In the United States/ United Kingdom education system, in elementary, middle, and high schools, the term science refers primarily to the natural sciences, with mathematics being a standalone subject, and the social sciences are combined with the humanities under the umbrella term social studies.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science,_technology,_engineering,_and_mathematics

Seagate Technology

Seagate Technology PLC (commonly referred to as Seagate) is an American data storage company. It was incorporated in 1978 as Shugart Technology and commenced business in 1979.[3] Since 2010, the company is incorporated in Dublin, Ireland, with operational headquarters in Fremont, California, United States.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seagate_Technology

Search engine

A search engine is a software system that is designed to carry out web searches (Internet searches), which means to search the World Wide Web in a systematic way for particular information specified in a textual web search query. The search results are generally presented in a line of results, often referred to as search engine results pages (SERPs) The information may be a mix of links to web pages, images, videos, infographics, articles, research papers, and other types of files. Some search engines also mine data available in databases or open directories. Unlike web directories, which are maintained only by human editors, search engines also maintain real-time information by running an algorithm on a web crawler. Internet content that is not capable of being searched by a web search engine is generally described as the deep web.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_engine

Search engine marketing

Search engine marketing (SEM) is a form of Internet marketing that involves the promotion of websites by increasing their visibility in search engine results pages (SERPs) primarily through paid advertising.[1] SEM may incorporate search engine optimization (SEO), which adjusts or rewrites website content and site architecture to achieve a higher ranking in search engine results pages to enhance pay per click (PPC) listings.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_engine_marketing

Search engine optimization

Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of improving the quality and quantity of website traffic to a website or a web page from search engines.[1] SEO targets unpaid traffic (known as “natural” or “organic” results) rather than direct traffic or paid traffic. Unpaid traffic may originate from different kinds of searches, including image search, video search, academic search,[2] news search, and industry-specific vertical search engines.

As an Internet marketing strategy, SEO considers how search engines work, the computer-programmed algorithms that dictate search engine behavior, what people search for, the actual search terms or keywords typed into search engines, and which search engines are preferred by their targeted audience. SEO is performed because a website will receive more visitors from a search engine when websites rank higher on the search engine results page (SERP). These visitors can then potentially be converted into customers.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_engine_optimization

Seiko

Seiko Holdings Corporation (セイコーホールディングス株式会社, Seikō Hōrudingusu Kabushiki-gaisha), commonly known as Seiko (/ˈseɪkoʊ/ SAY-koh, Japanese: [seːkoː]), is a Japanese maker of watches, clocks, electronic devices, semiconductors, jewelries, and optical products. Founded in 1881, it is known for introducing the world’s first quartz watch as well as the world’s first quartz watch with a chronograph complication.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiko

Self-driving car

A self-driving car, also known as an autonomous vehicle (AV or auto), driverless car, or robo-car[1][2][3] is a vehicle that is capable of sensing its environment and moving safely with little or no human input.

Self-driving cars combine a variety of sensors to perceive their surroundings, such as radar, lidar, sonar, GPS, odometry and inertial measurement units.[1][4] Advanced control systems interpret sensory information to identify appropriate navigation paths, as well as obstacles and relevant signage.[4][6][7][8]

Possible implementations of the technology include personal self-driving vehicles, shared robotaxis, connected vehicle platoons and long-distance trucking.[4] Several projects to develop a fully self-driving commercial car are in various stages of development. Waymo became the first service provider to offer robotaxi rides to the general public in Phoenix, Arizona in 2020, while Tesla has said it will offer subscription-based “full self-driving” to private vehicle owners in 2021,[9][10] and Nuro has been allowed to start autonomous commercial delivery operations in California in 2021.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-driving_car

Semiconductor

A semiconductor material has an electrical conductivity value falling between that of a conductor, such as metallic copper, and an insulator, such as glass. Its resistivity falls as its temperature rises; metals behave the opposite. Its conducting properties may be altered in useful ways by introducing impurities (“doping”) into the crystal structure. When two differently-doped regions exist in the same crystal, a semiconductor junction is created. The behavior of charge carriers, which include electrons, ions and electron holes, at these junctions is the basis of diodes, transistors and all modern electronics. Some examples of semiconductors are silicon, germanium, gallium arsenide, and elements near the so-called “metalloid staircase” on the periodic table. After silicon, gallium arsenide is the second most common semiconductor and is used in laser diodes, solar cells, microwave-frequency integrated circuits, and others. Silicon is a critical element for fabricating most electronic circuits.

Semiconductor devices can display a range of useful properties, such as passing current more easily in one direction than the other, showing variable resistance, and sensitivity to light or heat. Because the electrical properties of a semiconductor material can be modified by doping, or by the application of electrical fields or light, devices made from semiconductors can be used for amplification, switching, and energy conversion.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semiconductor

Sensor

In the broadest definition, a sensor is a device, module, machine, or subsystem whose purpose is to detect events or changes in its environment and send the information to other electronics, frequently a computer processor. A sensor is always used with other electronics.

Sensors are used in everyday objects such as touch-sensitive elevator buttons (tactile sensor) and lamps which dim or brighten by touching the base, besides innumerable applications of which most people are never aware. With advances in micromachinery and easy-to-use microcontroller platforms, the uses of sensors have expanded beyond the traditional fields of temperature, pressure or flow measurement, for example into MARG sensors. Moreover, analog sensors such as potentiometers and force-sensing resistors are still widely used. Applications include manufacturing and machinery, airplanes and aerospace, cars, medicine, robotics and many other aspects of our day-to-day life. There are a wide range of other sensors, measuring chemical & physical properties of materials. A few examples include optical sensors for Refractive index measurement, vibrational sensors for fluid viscosity measurement and electro-chemical sensor for monitoring pH of fluids.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sensor

Server (computing)

In computing, a server is a piece of computer hardware or software (computer program) that provides functionality for other programs or devices, called “clients”. This architecture is called the client–server model. Servers can provide various functionalities, often called “services”, such as sharing data or resources among multiple clients, or performing computation for a client. A single server can serve multiple clients, and a single client can use multiple servers. A client process may run on the same device or may connect over a network to a server on a different device. Typical servers are database servers, file servers, mail servers, print servers, web servers, game servers, and application servers.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Server_(computing)

Server room

A server room is a room, usually air-conditioned, devoted to the continuous operation of computer servers. An entire building or station devoted to this purpose is a data center.

The computers in server rooms are usually headless systems that can be operated remotely via KVM switch or remote administration software, such as Secure Shell (ssh), VNC, and remote desktop.[1][2][3][4][5]

Climate is one of the factors that affects the energy consumption and environmental impact of a server room. In areas where climate favors cooling and an abundance of renewable electricity, the environmental effects will be more moderate. Thus, countries with favorable conditions such as Canada,[6] Finland,[7] Sweden,[8] and Switzerland[9] are trying to attract more companies to site their server rooms there.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Server_room

Sharp Corporation

Sharp Corporation (シャープ株式会社, Shāpu Kabushiki-gaisha) is a Japanese multinational corporation that designs and manufactures electronic products, headquartered in Sakai-ku, Sakai, Osaka Prefecture. Since 2016 it has been majority owned by the Taiwan-based Foxconn Group. Sharp employs more than 50,000 people worldwide. The company was founded in September 1912 in Tokyo and takes its name from one of its founder’s first inventions, the Ever-Sharp mechanical pencil, which was invented by Tokuji Hayakawa in 1915.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharp_Corporation

Shazam (application)

Shazam is an American application owned by Apple Inc. The application can identify music, movies, advertising, and television shows, based on a short sample played and using the microphone on the device.[1] The software is available for Android, macOS, iOS, Wear OS and watchOS.

The original developer of the app, Shazam Entertainment Limited was founded in 1999 by Chris Barton, Philip Inghelbrecht, Avery Wang, and Dhiraj Mukherjee.[2] On September 24, 2018, the company was acquired by Apple for a reported $400 million.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shazam_(application)

Shopify

Shopify Inc. is a Canadian multinational e-commerce company headquartered in Ottawa, Ontario. It is also the name of its proprietary e-commerce platform for online stores and retail point-of-sale systems. Shopify offers online retailers a suite of services including payments, marketing, shipping and customer engagement tools.[4]

The company reported that it had more than 1,000,000 businesses in approximately 175 countries using its platform as of January 2021, but according to Builtwith, more than 3.6 million online stores run on Shopify. The total gross merchandise volume exceeded US$61 billion for calendar 2019. As of 2021, Shopify is the largest publicly traded Canadian company by market capitalization.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shopify

Show business

Show business, sometimes shortened to show biz or showbiz (since c. 1945), is a vernacular term for all aspects of the entertainment industry. From the business side (including managers, agents, producers, and distributors), the term applies to the creative element (including artists, performers, writers, musicians, and technicians) and was in common usage throughout the 20th century, though the first known use in print dates from 1850. At that time and for several decades, it typically included an initial the. By the latter part of the century, it had acquired a slightly arcane quality associated with the era of variety, but the term is still in active use. In modern entertainment industry, it is also associated with the fashion industry (creating trend and fashion) and acquiring intellectual property rights from the invested research in the entertainment business.

Industry
The global media and entertainment (M&E) market, including film, television shows and advertising, streaming media, music, broadcasting, radio, book publishing, video games, and ancillary services and products) was worth $1.72 trillion in 2015, $1.9 trillion in 2016, with extrapolations ranging to $2.14 trillion by 2020. About one third of the total ($735 billion in 2017) is made up by the U.S. entertainment industry, the largest M&E in the world.

Sectors and companies
Further information: Category:Entertainment companies
The entertainment sector can be split up into the following subsectors:

Amusement parks
Animation
Circus
Event management
Film
Gambling
Game manufacturers
Home video and home video distributors
Media
Music
Sex business
Talent agency
Theatre production
Sports entertainment
ISIC Edit
The industry segment is covered by class “R” of the International Standard Industrial Classification: “Arts, entertainment and recreation”.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Show_business

Siemens

Siemens AG (German pronunciation: [ˈziːməns][3][4][5] or [-mɛns][5]) is a German multinational conglomerate company headquartered in Munich and the largest industrial manufacturing company in Europe with branch offices abroad.

The principal divisions of the company are Industry, Energy, Healthcare (Siemens Healthineers), and Infrastructure & Cities, which represent the main activities of the company.[7][8][9] The company is a prominent maker of medical diagnostics equipment and its medical health-care division, which generates about 12 percent of the company’s total sales, is its second-most profitable unit, after the industrial automation division. The company is a component of the Euro Stoxx 50 stock market index.[10] Siemens and its subsidiaries employ approximately 385,000 people worldwide and reported global revenue of around €87 billion in 2019[11] according to its earnings release.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siemens

Silicon Integrated Systems

Silicon Integrated Systems (SiS; Chinese: 矽統科技; pinyin: Xìtǒng Kējì) is a company that manufactures, among other things, motherboard chipsets. The company was founded in 1987 in Hsinchu Science Park, Taiwan.

In the late 1990s, SiS made the decision to invest in their own chip fabrication facilities. At the end of 1999, SiS acquired Rise Technology and its mP6 x86 core technology.

One of the most famous chipsets produced by SiS was the late 486-age chipset 496/497 which supported PCI bus among older ISA- and VLB-buses. Mainboards using this chipset and equipped with CPUs such as the Intel 80486DX4, AMD 5×86 or Cyrix Cx5x86 processors had performance and compatibility comparable with early Intel Pentium systems in addition to a lower price.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicon_Integrated_Systems

SimilarWeb

SimilarWeb is a website that provides web analytics services for businesses. The company offers its customers information on their clients’ and competitors’ website traffic volumes, referral sources which include keyword analysis and demographics, and website “stickiness” (e.g., time on site, page views, bounce rate), as well as other features.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/SimilarWeb

Sina Weibo

Sina Weibo (Nasdaq: WB) (新浪微博) is a Chinese microblogging (weibo) website. Launched by Sina Corporation on 14 August 2009, it is one of the biggest social media platforms in China,[1] with over 445 million monthly active users as of Q3 2018. The platform has been a huge financial success, with surging stocks, lucrative advertising sales and high revenue and total earnings per quarter.[2][3] At the start of 2018, it surpassed the US$30 billion market valuation mark for the first time.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sina_Weibo

Skype

Skype (/skaɪp/) is a proprietary telecommunications application that specializes in providing video chat and voice calls between computers, tablets, mobile devices, the Xbox One console, and smartwatches over the Internet. Skype also provides instant messaging services. Users may transmit text, video, audio and images. Skype allows video conference calls.

At the end of 2010, there were over 660 million worldwide users, with over 300 million estimated active each month as of August 2015.[6] At one point in February 2012, there were 34 million users concurrently online on Skype.[7]

In March 2020, Skype was used by 100 million people on a monthly basis and by 40 million people on a daily basis,[8] which was a 70% increase in the number of daily users from the previous month, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skype

Smart city is an urban area that uses different types of electronic Internet of Things (IoT) sensors to collect data and then use insights gained from that data to manage assets, resources and services efficiently. This includes data collected from citizens, devices, and assets that is processed and analyzed to monitor and manage traffic and transportation systems, power plants, utilities, water supply networks, waste management, crime detection, information systems, schools, libraries, hospitals, and other community services.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_city

smart device is an electronic device, generally connected to other devices or networks via different wireless protocols such as Bluetooth, Zigbee, NFC, Wi-Fi, LiFi, 3G, etc., that can operate to some extent interactively and autonomously. Several notable types of smart devices are smartphones, smart cars, smart thermostats, smart doorbells, smart locks, smart refrigerators, phablets and tablets, smartwatches, smart bands, smart key chains, smart speakers and others. The term can also refer to a device that exhibits some properties of ubiquitous computing, including—although not necessarily—artificial intelligence.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_device

Smart doorbell

A smart doorbell is an internet-connected doorbell that notifies the smartphone or other electronic device of the home owner when a visitor arrives at the door. It activates when the visitor presses the button of the doorbell, or alternatively, when the doorbell senses a visitor with its built-in motion sensors. The smart doorbell lets the home owner use a smartphone app to watch and talk with the visitor by using the doorbell’s built-in high-definition infrared camera and microphone. They can be either battery operated or wired. [1] Some smart doorbells also allow the user to open the door remotely using a smart lock.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_doorbell

smart grid is an electrical grid which includes a variety of operation and energy measures including smart meters, smart appliances, renewable energy resources, and energy efficient resources. Electronic power conditioning and control of the production and distribution of electricity are important aspects of the smart grid.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_grid

Smart home technology which may also be termed Home automation is the use of devices in the home that connect via a network, most commonly a local LAN or the internet. It uses devices such as sensors and other appliances connected to the Internet of things (IoT) that can be remotely monitored, controlled or accessed and provide services that respond to the perceived needs of the users. It stands for Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology. The technology was originally developed by IBM and was referred to as Predictive failure analysis. The first contemporary Smart home technology products became available to consumers between 1998 and the early 2000s. Smart home technology allows users to control and monitor their connected home devices from smart home apps, smartphones, or other networked devices. Users can remotely control connected home systems whether they are home or away. This allows for more efficient energy and electric use as well as ensuring your home is secure. Smart home technology contributes to health and well-being enhancement by accommodating people with special needs, especially older people. Smart home technology is now being used to create Smart cities. A Smart city functions similar to a Smart home, where systems are monitored to more efficiently run the cities and save money.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_home_technology

Smart lock

A smart lock is an electromechanical lock which is designed to perform locking and unlocking operations on a door when it receives such instructions from an authorized device using a wireless protocol and a cryptographic key to execute the authorization process. It also monitors access and sends alerts for the different events it monitors and some other critical events related to the status of the device. Smart locks can be considered part of a smart home.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_lock

Smart refrigerator

A smart refrigerator, also known as internet refrigerator, is a refrigerator which is able to communicate with the internet.[1] This kind of refrigerator is often equipped to determine itself whenever a food item needs to be replenished.

By the late 1990s and the early 2000s, the idea of connecting home appliances to the internet (Internet of Things) had been popularized and was seen as the next big thing. In June 2000, LG launched the world’s first internet refrigerator, the Internet Digital DIOS. This refrigerator was an unsuccessful product because the consumers had seen it as unnecessary and expensive (more than $20,000).

View more – Wikipedia.org

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_refrigerator

Smart speaker

A smart speaker is a type of speaker and voice command device with an integrated virtual assistant that offers interactive actions and hands-free activation with the help of one “hot word” (or several “hot words”). Some smart speakers can also act as a smart device that utilizes Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and other protocol standards to extend usage beyond audio playback, such as to control home automation devices. This can include, but is not limited to, features such as compatibility across a number of services and platforms, peer-to-peer connection through mesh networking, virtual assistants, and others. Each can have its own designated interface and features in-house, usually launched or controlled via application or home automation software.[1] Some smart speakers also include a screen to show the user a visual response.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_speaker

Smart thermostat

Smart thermostats are thermostats that can be used with home automation and are responsible for controlling a home’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. They perform similar functions as a Programmable thermostat as they allow the user to control the temperature of their home throughout the day using a schedule, but also contain additional features, such as sensors and WiFi connectivity, that improve upon the issues with programmable thermostats.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_thermostat

Smart TV

Smart TV, also known as a connected TV (CTV), is a traditional television set with integrated Internet and interactive Web 2.0 features which allows users to stream music and videos, browse the internet, and view photos. Smart TV is a technological convergence of computers, television sets and set-top boxes. Besides the traditional functions of television sets and set-top boxes provided through traditional broadcasting media, these devices can also provide Internet TV, online interactive media, over-the-top content (OTT), as well as on-demand streaming media, and home networking access.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_TV

Smatphone

Smartphones are a class of mobile phones and of multi-purpose mobile computing devices. They are distinguished from feature phones by their stronger hardware capabilities and extensive mobile operating systems, which facilitate wider software, internet (including web browsing over mobile broadband), and multimedia functionality (including music, video, cameras, and gaming), alongside core phone functions such as voice calls and text messaging. Smartphones typically contain a number of metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) integrated circuit (IC) chips, include various sensors that can be leveraged by their software (such as a magnetometer, proximity sensors, barometer, gyroscope, or accelerometer), and support wireless communications protocols (such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, or satellite navigation).

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smartphone

Smartwatch

smartwatch is a wearable computer in the form of a wristwatch; modern smartwatches provide a local touchscreen interface for daily use, while an associated smartphone app provides for management and telemetry (such as long-term biomonitoring). While early models could perform basic tasks, such as calculations, digital time telling, translations, and game-playing, 2010s smartwatches have more general functionality closer to smartphones, including mobile apps, a mobile operating system and WiFi/Bluetooth connectivity. Some smartwatches function as portable media players, with FM radio and playback of digital audio and video files via a Bluetooth headset. Some models, called ‘watch phones’ (or vice versa), have mobile cellular functionality like making calls.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smartwatch

SMS

SMS (short message service) is a text messaging service component of most telephone, Internet, and mobile device systems. It uses standardized communication protocols that let mobile devices exchange short text messages. An intermediary service can facilitate a text-to-voice conversion to be sent to landlines.[1]

SMS, as used on modern devices, originated from radio telegraphy in radio memo pagers that used standardized phone protocols. These were defined in 1985 as part of the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) series of standards.[2] The first test SMS message was sent on December 3, 1992, when Neil Papwort, a test engineer for Sema Group, used a personal computer to send “Merry Christmas” to the phone of colleague Richard Jarvis.[3] SMS rolled out commercially on many cellular networks that decade and became hugely popular worldwide as a method of text communication.[4] By the end of 2010, SMS was the most widely used data application, with an estimated 3.5 billion active users, or about 80% of all mobile phone subscribers.

The service allows users to send and receive messages of up to 160 characters (when entirely alpha-numeric) to and from GSM mobiles. Although most SMS messages are sent from one mobile phone to another, support for the service has expanded to include other mobile technologies, such as ANSI CDMA networks and Digital AMPS.[5]

Mobile marketing, a type of direct marketing, uses SMS.[6] According to a 2018 market research report, the global SMS messaging business was estimated to be worth over US$100 billion, accounting for almost 50 percent of all revenue generated by mobile messaging.[7]

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMS

Snapchat

Snapchat is an American multimedia messaging app developed by Snap Inc., originally Snapchat Inc. One of the principal features of Snapchat is that pictures and messages are usually only available for a short time before they become inaccessible to their recipients. The app has evolved from originally focusing on person-to-person photo sharing to presently featuring users’ “Stories” of 24 hours of chronological content, along with “Discover,” letting brands show ad-supported short-form content. It also allows users to keep photos in the “my eyes only” which lets them keep their photos in a password-protected space. It has also reportedly incorporated limited use of end-to-end encryption, with plans to broaden its use in the future.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snapchat

Social media

Social media are interactive digitally-mediated technologies that facilitate the creation or sharing/exchange of information, ideas, career interests, and other forms of expression via virtual communities and networks.[1][2] While challenges to the definition of social media arise due to the broad variety of stand-alone and built-in social-media services currently available, there are some common features:[2]

Social media are interactive Web 2.0 Internet-based applications.[2][3]
User-generated content—such as text posts or comments, digital photos or videos, and data generated through all online interactions—is the lifeblood of social media.[2][3]
Users create service-specific profiles for the website or app that are designed and maintained by the social-media organization.[2][4]
Social media facilitate the development of online social networks by connecting a user’s profile with those of other individuals or groups.[2][4]
Users usually access social media services via web-based apps on desktops and laptops, or download services that offer social media functionality to their mobile devices (e.g., smartphones and tablets). As users engage with these electronic services, they create highly interactive platforms through which individuals, communities, and organizations can share, co-create, discuss, participate, and modify user-generated content or self-curated content posted online.[1] Additionally, social media are used to document memories; learn about and explore things; advertise oneself; and form friendships along with the growth of ideas from the creation of blogs, podcasts, videos, and gaming sites.[5] This changing relationship between human and technology is the focus of the emerging field of technoself studies.

Some of the most popular social media websites, with over 100 million registered users, include Facebook (and its associated Facebook Messenger), TikTok, WeChat, Instagram, QZone, Weibo, Twitter, Tumblr, Baidu Tieba, and LinkedIn. Depending on interpretation, other popular platforms that are sometimes referred to as social media services include YouTube, QQ, Quora, Telegram, WhatsApp, LINE, Snapchat, Pinterest, Viber, Reddit, Discord, VK, Microsoft Teams, and more. Wikis are examples of collaborative content creation.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_media

Social network

A social network is a social structure made up of a set of social actors (such as individuals or organizations), sets of dyadic ties, and other social interactions between actors. The social network perspective provides a set of methods for analyzing the structure of whole social entities as well as a variety of theories explaining the patterns observed in these structures.[1] The study of these structures uses social network analysis to identify local and global patterns, locate influential entities, and examine network dynamics.

Social networks and the analysis of them is an inherently interdisciplinary academic field which emerged from social psychology, sociology, statistics, and graph theory. Georg Simmel authored early structural theories in sociology emphasizing the dynamics of triads and “web of group affiliations”.[2] Jacob Moreno is credited with developing the first sociograms in the 1930s to study interpersonal relationships. These approaches were mathematically formalized in the 1950s and theories and methods of social networks became pervasive in the social and behavioral sciences by the 1980s.[1][3] Social network analysis is now one of the major paradigms in contemporary sociology, and is also employed in a number of other social and formal sciences. Together with other complex networks, it forms part of the nascent field of network science.[4][5]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_network

Social networking service

social networking service (also social networking site or social media) is an online platform which people use to build social networks or social relationship with other people who share similar personal or career interests, activities, backgrounds or real-life connections.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_networking_service

Software

Software is a collection of instructions and data that tell the computer how to work. This is in contrast to physical hardware, from which the system is built and actually performs the work. In computer science and software engineering, computer software is all information processed by computer systems, including programs and data. Computer software includes computer programs, libraries and related non-executable data, such as online documentation or digital media. Computer hardware and software require each other and neither can be realistically used on its own.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software

Software engineering

Software engineering is the systematic application of engineering approaches to the development of software.

When the first digital computers appeared in the early 1940s,[4] the instructions to make them operate were wired into the machine. Practitioners quickly realized that this design was not flexible and came up with the “stored program architecture” or von Neumann architecture. Thus the division between “hardware” and “software” began with abstraction being used to deal with the complexity of computing.

Programming languages started to appear in the early 1950s[5] and this was also another major step in abstraction. Major languages such as Fortran, ALGOL, PL/I, and COBOL were released in the late 1950 and 1960s to deal with scientific, algorithmic, and business problems respectively. David Parnas introduced the key concept of modularity and information hiding in 1972 to help programmers deal with the ever-increasing complexity of software systems.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_engineering

Solid-state drive – SSD

A solid-state drive (SSD) is a solid-state storage device that uses integrated circuit assemblies to store data persistently, typically using flash memory, and functioning as secondary storage in the hierarchy of computer storage. It is also sometimes called a solid-state device or a solid-state disk,[1] even though SSDs lack the physical spinning disks and movable read–write heads used in hard disk drives (HDDs) and floppy disks.[2]

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solid-state_drive

Sony

Sony Corporation (ソニー株式会社, Sonī kabushiki gaisha, /ˈsoʊni/ SOH-nee, commonly known as Sony and stylized as SONY) is a Japanese multinational conglomerate corporation headquartered in Kōnan, Minato, Tokyo. The company operates as one of the world’s largest manufacturers of consumer and professional electronic products, the largest video game console company, the second largest video game publisher, the second largest record company, as well as one of the most comprehensive media companies, being the largest Japanese media conglomerate by size overtaking the privately held, family-owned Yomiuri Shimbun Holdings, the largest Japanese media conglomerate by revenue.

Sony, with its 50 percent market share in the image sensor market, is among the semiconductor sales leaders[10][11] and, as of 2015, the fifth-largest television manufacturer in the world by annual sales figures. It is the world’s largest player in the premium TV market, a market for a television of at least 55 inches with a price higher than $2,500.

Sony Corporation is the holding company of the Sony Group (ソニー・グループ, Sonī Gurūpu), which comprises Sony Electronics, Sony Semiconductor Solutions, Sony Pictures, Sony Music, Sony Interactive Entertainment, Sony Financial Holdings, and others.

The company’s slogan is Be Moved. Their former slogans were The One and Only (1979–1982), It’s a Sony (1982–2005), like.no.other (2005–2009) and make.believe (2009–2013).[15]

Sony has a weak tie to the Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group (SMFG) corporate group, the successor to the Mitsui group.[16] Sony is listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange (in which it is a constituent of the Nikkei 225 and TOPIX Core30 indexes) with an additional listing in the form of American depositary receipts listed in the New York Stock Exchange (traded since 1970, making it the oldest Japanese company to be listed in an American exchange), and was ranked 122nd on the 2020 Fortune Global 500 list.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sony

Sony Music

Sony Music Entertainment (commonly referred to as Sony Music) is an American global music company. Owned by the Japanese conglomerate Sony Corporation, it is part of the Sony Music Group,[3] which is owned by Sony Corporation of America.

It was originally founded in 1929 as American Record Corporation and renamed as Columbia Recording Corporation in 1938, following its acquisition by the Columbia Broadcasting System. In 1966, the company was reorganized to become CBS Records, and Sony Corporation bought the company in 1988, renaming it under its current name in 1991. In 2004, Sony and Bertelsmann established a 50-50 joint venture known as Sony BMG, which transferred the businesses of Sony Music and Bertelsmann Music Group into one entity. However, in 2008, Sony acquired Bertelsmann’s stake, and the company reverted to the Sony Music name shortly after; the buyout allowed Sony to acquire all of BMG’s labels, and led to the dissolution of BMG, which instead relaunched as BMG Rights Management.

As of 2020, Sony Music Entertainment is the second largest of the “Big Three” record companies, behind Universal Music Group and followed by Warner Music Group. Its music publishing division Sony/ATV (now known as Sony Music Publishing) is the largest music publisher in the world.[4][5] From 2009-2020, Sony owned 50% of Syco Entertainment, which operates some of the world’s most successful reality TV formats, including Got Talent and The X Factor with Simon Cowell. Cowell acquired Sony’s stake in 2020.[6]

On July 17, 2019, Sony announced that Sony Music Entertainment and Sony/ATV would merge to become Sony Music Group.[7][8] The merger was completed on August 1, 2019.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sony_Music

Sony Pictures

Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. (commonly known as Sony Pictures or SPE, and formerly known as Columbia Pictures Entertainment Inc.) is an American entertainment company that produces, acquires, and distributes filmed entertainment (theatrical motion pictures, television programs, and recorded videos) through multiple platforms. Through an intermediate holding company called Sony Film Holding Inc., it is operated as a subsidiary of Sony Entertainment Inc., which is itself a subsidiary of the multinational technology and media conglomerate Sony Group Corporation.[4][5] Based at the Sony Pictures Studios lot in Culver City, California, it encompasses Sony’s motion picture, television production and distribution units. Its group sales in the fiscal year 2017 (April 2017 – March 2018) has been reported to be $9.133 billion.[3]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sony_Pictures

SoundCloud

SoundCloud is an online audio distribution platform and music sharing website based in Berlin, Germany, that enables its users to upload, promote, and share audio, as well as a DSP enabling listeners to stream audio. Started in 2007 by Alexander Ljung and Eric Wahlforss, SoundCloud has grown to be one of the largest music streaming services reaching over 175 million monthly users worldwide.[4] SoundCloud offers both free and paid membership on the platform, available for desktop and mobile devices.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/SoundCloud

Source code

In computing, source code is any collection of code, with or without comments, written using[1] a human-readable programming language, usually as plain text. The source code of a program is specially designed to facilitate the work of computer programmers, who specify the actions to be performed by a computer mostly by writing source code. The source code is often transformed by an assembler or compiler into binary machine code that can be executed by the computer. The machine code might then be stored for execution at a later time. Alternatively, source code may be interpreted and thus immediately executed.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Source_code

The speed of light in vacuum, commonly denoted c, is a universal physical constant important in many areas of physics. Its exact value is defined as 299792458 metres per second (approximately 300000 km/s (186000 mi/s)).

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_light

Spotify

Spotify Technology S.A (/ˈspɒtɪfaɪ/; Swedish: [ˈspɔ̂tːɪfaj]) is a Swedish audio streaming and media services provider, founded in 2006 by Daniel Ek. The company is incorporated in Luxembourg and headquartered in Stockholm, Sweden, with offices in 17 different countries around the world.[4][5] It is one of the world’s largest music streaming service providers, with over 345 million monthly active users, including 155 million paying subscribers, as of December 2020.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spotify

Startup company

A startup or start-up is a company or project undertaken by an entrepreneur to seek, develop, and validate a scalable economic model. While entrepreneurship refers to all new businesses, including self-employment and businesses that never intend to become registered, startups refer to new businesses that intend to grow large beyond the solo founder. At the beginning, startups face high uncertainty[4] and have high rates of failure, but a minority of them do go on to be successful and influential. Some startups become unicorns; that is privately held startup companies valued at over US$1 billion.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Startup_company

Statistics

Statistics is the discipline that concerns the collection, organization, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of data.[1][2][3] In applying statistics to a scientific, industrial, or social problem, it is conventional to begin with a statistical population or a statistical model to be studied. Populations can be diverse groups of people or objects such as “all people living in a country” or “every atom composing a crystal”. Statistics deals with every aspect of data, including the planning of data collection in terms of the design of surveys and experiments.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statistics

Steam (service)

Steam is a video game digital distribution service by Valve. It was launched as a standalone software client in September 2003 as a way for Valve to provide automatic updates for their games, and expanded to include games from third-party publishers. Steam has also expanded into an online web-based and mobile digital storefront. Steam offers digital rights management (DRM), server hosting, video streaming, and social networking services. It also provides the user with installation and automatic updating of games, and community features such as friends lists and groups, cloud storage, and in-game voice and chat functionality.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steam_(service)

Stellantis

Stellantis N.V. is a multinational automotive manufacturer with its headquarters in Amsterdam, the Netherlands,[10][11] which was formed by the 2021 merger of Italian-American company Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and French company Groupe PSA on the basis of a 50-50 cross-border merger agreement.[10] The group has a wide portfolio of automotive brands: Abarth, Alfa Romeo, Chrysler, Citroën, Dodge, DS Automobiles, Fiat, Fiat Professional, Jeep, Lancia, Maserati, Opel, Peugeot, Ram Trucks and Vauxhall Motors. The name Stellantis is exclusively used to identify the corporate entity, while group brand names and logos remain unchanged.[10]

The company has 400,000 employees, a presence in more than 130 countries with manufacturing facilities in 30 countries.[12] The group plans to have 39 electrified vehicles available by the end of 2021.

Brand Founded Brand CEO
Jeep 1941 Christian Meunier
Chrysler 1925 Timothy Kuniskis
Dodge 1914
Ram 2010[a] Michael Koval
Fiat 1899 Olivier François
Abarth 1949
Lancia 1906 Luca Napolitano
Alfa Romeo 1910 Jean-Philippe Imparato
Maserati 1914 Davide Grasso
Citroën 1919 Vincent Cobée
Peugeot 1810 Linda Jackson
Opel 1862 Michael Lohscheller
Vauxhall 1857
DS Automobiles 2014 Béatrice Foucher

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stellantis

Storage efficiency

Storage efficiency is the ability to store and manage data that consumes the least amount of space with little to no impact on performance; resulting in a lower total operational cost. Efficiency addresses the real-world demands of managing costs, reducing complexity and limiting risk.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storage_efficiency

Stream (computing)

In computer science, a stream is a sequence of data elements made available over time. A stream can be thought of as items on a conveyor belt being processed one at a time rather than in large batches.

Streams are processed differently from batch data – normal functions cannot operate on streams as a whole, as they have potentially unlimited data, and formally, streams are codata (potentially unlimited), not data (which is finite). Functions that operate on a stream, producing another stream, are known as filters, and can be connected in pipelines, analogously to function composition. Filters may operate on one item of a stream at a time, or may base an item of output on multiple items of input, such as a moving average.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stream_(computing)

Streaming media

Streaming media is multimedia that is constantly received by and presented to an end-user while being delivered by a provider. The verb “to stream” refers to the process of delivering or obtaining media in this manner; the term refers to the delivery method of the medium, rather than the medium itself, and is an alternative to file downloading, a process in which the end-user obtains the entire file for the content before watching or listening to it.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streaming_media

Streaming television

Streaming television is the digital distribution of television content, such as TV shows, as streaming media delivered over the Internet. Streaming TV stands in contrast to dedicated terrestrial television delivered by over-the-air aerial systems, cable television, and/or satellite television systems. The use of streaming online video and streaming television is concentrated on streaming video on demand platforms such as Netflix, Hulu, Prime Video, Peacock, Disney+, Apple TV+, and Paramount+.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streaming_television

Sun Microsystems

Sun Microsystems, Inc. (Sun for short) was an American company that sold computers, computer components, software, and information technology services and created the Java programming language, the Solaris operating system, ZFS, the Network File System (NFS), and SPARC microprocessors. Sun contributed significantly to the evolution of several key computing technologies, among them Unix, RISC processors, thin client computing, and virtualized computing. Sun was founded on February 24, 1982.[2] At its height, the Sun headquarters were in Santa Clara, California (part of Silicon Valley), on the former west campus of the Agnews Developmental Center.

On April 20, 2009, it was announced that Oracle Corporation would acquire Sun for US$7.4 billion. The deal was completed on January 27, 2010.[3]

Sun products included computer servers and workstations built on its own RISC-based SPARC processor architecture, as well as on x86-based AMD Opteron and Intel Xeon processors. Sun also developed its own storage systems and a suite of software products, including the Solaris operating system, developer tools, Web infrastructure software, and identity management applications. Technologies included the Java platform and NFS. In general, Sun was a proponent of open systems, particularly Unix. It was also a major contributor to open-source software, as evidenced by its $1 billion purchase, in 2008, of MySQL, an open-source relational database management system.[4][5] At various times, Sun had manufacturing facilities in several locations worldwide, including Newark, California; Hillsboro, Oregon; and Linlithgow, Scotland. However, by the time the company was acquired by Oracle, it had outsourced most manufacturing responsibilities.

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_Microsystems

Supercar

A supercar – also called exotic car – is a loosely defined description of street-legal, high-performance luxury sports car. Since the 2000s or 2010s, the term hypercar has come into use for the highest performing supercars. Supercars commonly serve as the flagship model within a vehicle manufacturer’s lineup of sports cars.

In the United States, muscle cars were often referred to as “supercars” during the 1960s.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supercar

Supercomputer

A supercomputer is a computer with a high level of performance as compared to a general-purpose computer. The performance of a supercomputer is commonly measured in floating-point operations per second (FLOPS) instead of million instructions per second (MIPS). Since 2017, there are supercomputers which can perform over 1017 FLOPS (a hundred quadrillion FLOPS, 100 petaFLOPS or 100 PFLOPS).[3] Since November 2017, all of the world’s fastest 500 supercomputers run Linux-based operating systems.[4] Additional research is being conducted in the United States, the European Union, Taiwan, Japan, and China to build faster, more powerful and technologically superior exascale supercomputers.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supercomputer

Supercomputers – TOP 500

NEWS
TOP500 Expands Exaflops Capacity Amidst Low Turnover
FRANKFURT, Germany; BERKELEY, Calif.; and KNOXVILLE, Tenn.—The 56th edition of the TOP500 saw the Japanese Fugaku supercomputer solidify its number one status in a list that reflects a flattening performance growth curve. Although two new systems managed to make it into the top 10, the full list recorded the smallest number of new entries since the project began in 1993.

View more:

https://www.top500.org/

The TOP500 project ranks and details the 500 most powerful non-distributed computer systems in the world. The project was started in 1993 and publishes an updated list of the supercomputers twice a year. The first of these updates always coincides with the International Supercomputing Conference in June, and the second is presented at the ACM/IEEE Supercomputing Conference in November. The project aims to provide a reliable basis for tracking and detecting trends in high-performance computing and bases rankings on HPL, a portable implementation of the high-performance LINPACK benchmark written in Fortran for distributed-memory computers.

Currently the latest TOP500 list is the 56th published in November 2020. Since June 2020, the Japanese Fugaku is the world’s most powerful supercomputer, reaching initially 415.53 petaFLOPS and 442.01 petaFlops after an update in November 2020 on the LINPACK benchmarks. China currently dominates the list with 212 supercomputers, leading the second place (United States) by a record margin of 113. Ranked by performance the most powerful supercomputers are located in the US (669 petaFLOPS). Followed by Japan (594 petaFLOPS) and China (564 petaFLOPS).

View more:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/TOP500

Suzuki

Suzuki Motor Corporation (Japanese: スズキ株式会社, Hepburn: Suzuki Kabushiki-Kaisha)[3] is a Japanese multinational corporation headquartered in Minami-ku, Hamamatsu.[4] Suzuki manufactures automobiles, four-wheel drive vehicles, motorcycles, all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), outboard marine engines, wheelchairs and a variety of other small internal combustion engines. In 2016, Suzuki was the eleventh biggest automaker by production worldwide.[5] Suzuki has over 45,000 employees and has 35 production facilities in 23 countries, and 133 distributors in 192 countries. The worldwide sales volume of automobiles is the world’s tenth largest,[6] while domestic sales volume is the third largest in the country.[7]

View more – Wikipedia.org:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzuki

Swatch Internet Time (or .beat time) is a decimal time concept introduced in 1998 by the Swatch corporation as part of their marketing campaign for their line of “Beat” watches.

Instead of hours and minutes, the mean solar day is divided into 1000 parts called “.beats”. Each .beat is equal to one decimal minute in the French Revolutionary decimal time system and lasts 1 minute and 26.4 seconds (86.4 seconds) in standard time. Times are notated as a 3-digit number out of 1000 after midnight. So, for example @248 would indicate a time 248 .beats after midnight representing ​2481000 of a day, just over 5 hours and 57 minutes.

There are no time zones in Swatch Internet Time; instead, the new time scale of Biel Mean Time (BMT) is used, based on Swatch’s headquarters in Biel, Switzerland and equivalent to Central European Time, West Africa Time, and UTC+01. Unlike civil time in Switzerland and many other countries, Swatch Internet Time does not observe daylight saving time.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swatch_Internet_Time

Switch

In electrical engineering, a switch is an electrical component that can disconnect or connect the conducting path in an electrical circuit, interrupting the electric current or diverting it from one conductor to another. The most common type of switch is an electromechanical device consisting of one or more sets of movable electrical contacts connected to external circuits. When a pair of contacts is touching current can pass between them, while when the contacts are separated no current can flow.

Switches are made in many different configurations; they may have multiple sets of contacts controlled by the same knob or actuator, and the contacts may operate simultaneously, sequentially, or alternately. A switch may be operated manually, for example, a light switch or a keyboard button, or may function as a sensing element to sense the position of a machine part, liquid level, pressure, or temperature, such as a thermostat. Many specialized forms exist, such as the toggle switch, rotary switch, mercury switch, pushbutton switch, reversing switch, relay, and circuit breaker. A common use is control of lighting, where multiple switches may be wired into one circuit to allow convenient control of light fixtures. Switches in high-powered circuits must have special construction to prevent destructive arcing when they are opened.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switch

System

system is a group of interacting or interrelated entities that form a unified whole. A system is delineated by its spatial and temporal boundaries, surrounded and influenced by its environment, described by its structure and purpose and expressed in its functioning. Systems are the subjects of study of systems theory.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/System

Systems engineering is an interdisciplinary field of engineering and engineering management that focuses on how to design and manage complex systems over their life cycles. At its core, systems engineering utilizes systems thinking principles to organize this body of knowledge. The individual outcome of such efforts, an engineered system, can be defined as a combination of components that work in synergy to collectively perform a useful function.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Systems_engineering

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.